Scientific Publications

Here you will find some of our research articles, MS projects, and papers published in scientific journals, as well as three great resources published through The Ohio State University's Extension program.

Johns Hopkins Press
coyote with color variation
coyote relocation poster presentation
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OSU Extension fact sheet "Community-Level Strategies for Urban Coyote Management"626.83 KB
OSU Extension fact sheet "Urban Coyotes: Conflict and Management"414.57 KB
OSU Extension bulletin "Urban Coyotes Conflict and Management" 332.38 KB
Broomfield, CO Report outlining conflicts and consults1.79 MB
PLOS ONE Journal "Population Ecology of Free-Roaming Cats and Interference Competition by Coyotes in Urban Parks"3.19 MB
American Midland Naturalist "Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Diet of Coyotes in the Chicago Metropolitan Area"208.28 KB
Behavioral Ecology "Interference Competition Between Coyotes and Raccoons: a test of the mesopredator release hypothesis"337.29 KB
Journal of Mammalogy "Response of Skunks to a Simulated Increase in Coyote Activity"262.1 KB
Conference Proceedings "Ecology of Coyotes in Urban Landscapes"56.73 KB
Human Dimensions of Wildlife "Coyote Attacks on Humans in the US and Canada"951.39 KB
Journal of Mammalogy "Long-term Pair Bonding and Genetic Evidence for Monogamy Among Urban Coyotes"405.09 KB
Journal of Mammalogy "Home Range and Landscape Use of Coyotes in a Metropolitan Landscape: Conflict or Coexistence?"2.72 MB
Cities and the Environment (online journal) "Is the Urban Coyote a Misanthropic Synanthrope? The Case from Chicago"3.68 MB
Master's Thesis - Justin Brown "Influence of Coyotes on an Urban Canada Goose Population"653.22 KB
Master's Thesis, Cecilia Hennessy "Mating Strategies and Pack Structure of Coyotes in an Urban Landscape"1.24 MB
Master's Thesis, Alison Willingham (Brown) "Emerging Factors Associated with the Decline of a Gray Fox Population"5.89 MB
Master's Thesis, Evan Wilson "The Dynamics of Sarcoptic Mange in an Urban Coyote (Canis latrans) Population"2.91 MB
Coyote 1

Coyote 1 was the first coyote captured on the project, on March 22, 2000, and has become the signature coyote of our research. When she was originally captured, she was just a year old and solitary. She weighed 13 kg (about 29 lbs), and was in excellent health, if not a little on the small side. In coyote years, she was a teenager. We tracked her movements over portions of five cities for the next nine months, as she floated across the landscape looking for a territory.